Coworking at Workantile

One of the challenges of distributed work is isolation. Our third places are already disappearing, losing the office as a second place can be tough. So, about once a week, I drive over half an hour to Workantile, a coworking space in Ann Arbor.

It started with the Ann Arbor Software Co-Workers. I attended a few of those meetups at a coffee shop and was reminded that there is something energizing about being around people. At the same time, I wanted somewhere that I could hop on a video call. I wanted somewhere I didn’t have to make sure that someone watched my bag when I went to the bathroom. Somewhere I didn’t have to OD on caffeine to make sure I’m paying my rent. So I wound up at Workantile.

[As an aside, my employer has a coworking stipend that covers traditional coworking spaces as well as coffee rent at coffee shops. Companies that want to support distributed workers, take note.]

Workantile is part of a vanishing breed. There are plenty of coworking spaces that are “you pay money, get desk, end of story.” There are also plenty of incubators that want to host your startup. What Workantile focuses on are the independent contractors and the remote workers that want a second place. Here’s how they put it:

At Workantile our goal is to support the work and social needs of independent workers typically already established in their job or business, whether they’re self-employed or remote employees. Workantile creates a diverse workplace environment without the office politics. Our social network isn’t for smarmy business-oriented “networking,” but for real social interaction and camaraderie.

Quartz has a great write-up on how coworking has moved from the Workantile model to the other models. Companies like WeWork have been focused on flexible office space, ignoring any sort of community aspect. That probably makes financial sense, but I’m not really interested in “Office Hotelling.” It’s kind of disheartening that as more workers are becoming remote and distributed, social coworking is on its way out.

There’s a new coworking space “Pastel” opening much closer to me – a 5 minute commute instead of a 35 minute commute. Their vision is “a place for independent business women to find support, balance and connection.” That’s not quite me, but I’m glad to see other coworking spaces opening to focus on something other than real estate. I will be keeping an eye on them but for now it sounds like Workantile is a better fit.

Don’t get me wrong: I still loathe commutes but once a week is the right balance for me right now.

[Photo credit Chris Salzman]

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